Legionnaire:

How Much Protein is in Chicken

If you’re looking to increase your protein intake, you’ll need to alter your diet. In this article, we’ll talk about how much protein is in chicken, why you should care, and how it compares to other sources of protein.

Who Cares How Much Protein Is In Chicken

If you’re looking to get in shape or maintain your current level of fitness, you should care. Protein is one of three essential macronutrients that your body needs to be healthy and active. Protein helps your muscles grow bigger and stronger, gives your hair shine and bounce, and helps your skin look healthy. You need protein to recover from a hard workout and to maintain the gains you’ve made.

Protein is important for so many reasons.

In addition, you need to know about the quality of your protein. All protein sources are made of different kinds of amino acids. Even though there are hundreds of different amino acids, your body uses 21 of them to synthesize protein. Nine of these amino acids are called essential amino acids because your body cannot make them and you need to get them through your diet. The others are called nonessential amino acids because your body either makes them on its own or modifies existing aminos to create them.

If you’re looking to grow more muscle, or increase a missing essential amino acid, you’ll need to change your diet. The best way to do this is knowing which foods will give you the macros and nutrients you want and need.

That’s why knowing the nutritional content of your food is so important.

How Much Protein Is In Chicken

The protein count in a portion of chicken is going to change depending on what part of the chicken you eat. So will the other macronutrients as well. Below is a list of the different parts of a chicken as well as its protein composition per 100 grams of meat.

Chicken breasts have 31 grams per 100 grams of meat
Chicken thighs have 26 grams per 100 grams of meat
Chicken drumsticks have 28.3 grams per 100 grams of meat
Chicken wings have 30.5 grams per 100 grams of meat

As you can see, the chicken breast has the most protein in it, compared to other parts of the chicken, but not by much.

It’s also important to take into consideration how you’re eating your chicken meat. Chicken wings have almost as much protein as the breast. At the same time, a lot of wings are covered in breading which really adds to the carb count or sauce, which adds sugar. Chicken skin will also add a significant amount of fat to your meal which may make it less healthy compared to a lower-protein counterpart without skin.

The most important takeaway here is that not all chicken is created equal, but all chicken still has a fair amount of protein in it.

Another good thing about chicken is like most other animal proteins, chicken has a complete amino acid. This makes getting those amino acids you need even easier.

Chicken Vs Beef

Some people may find it surprising that 100 grams of beef has about 26 grams of protein, meaning it has less protein than chicken does. Of course, the exact amount of protein is going to change depending on the cut and fat content. That 26 percent figure comes from ground beef which has a 15 percent fat content. Here are some other types of beef and their protein count per 100 grams.

Ground beef with 30 percent fat content – 14 grams of protein per 100 grams of meat
Brisket – 21 grams of protein per 100 grams of meat
Flank steak – 28 grams of protein per 100 grams of meat
T-bone steak – 24 grams of protein per 100 grams of meat
Top sirloin steak – 27 grams of protein per 100 grams of meat

Chicken Vs Fish

Fish usually has less protein than chicken. Although some kinds of fish have more protein than other specific kinds of chicken. Here are a couple kinds of fish and their protein content per 100 grams of fish.

Atlantic Salmon – 22 grams of protein per 100 grams of fish
Mackerel – 19 grams of protein per 100 grams of fish
Mahi Mahi – 19 grams of protein per 100 grams of fish
Rainbow Trout – 20 grams of protein per 100 grams of fish
Skipjack Tuna – 28 grams of protein per 100 grams of fish

As you can see, if you were looking strictly to maximize your protein intake, eating tuna is going to be better for you than eating chicken thighs. That being said, chicken still wins out most of the time.

Chicken Vs Dairy

Although various dairy products do contain protein, it usually lags far behind meat products. Dairy also typically contains more calories due to higher amounts of carbohydrates and fats. Usually, it’s wise to avoid using dairy as one of your primary protein sources in your diet unless it is from a high-quality whey protein.

Here’s the protein count of different kinds of dairy products per 100 grams.

Butter – .9 grams of protein per 100 grams of dairy
Cheddar cheese – 25 grams of protein per 100 grams of dairy
1 percent milk – 3.4 grams of protein per 100 grams of dairy
Yogurt – 10 grams of protein per 100 grams of dairy
Light cream – 2.7 grams of protein per 100 grams of dairy

Chicken Vs Vegetables

The biggest flaw with getting your protein from vegetables is that most vegetables are incomplete proteins, meaning they’re missing one or more of the essential aminos that your body needs for protein synthesis.

Below are some different vegetables and the amount of protein they contain per 100 grams.

Black beans – 22 grams of protein per 100 grams of vegetables
Kale – 4.3 grams of protein per 100 grams of vegetables
Baked beans – 6 grams of protein per 100 grams of vegetables
Spinach – 1.9 grams of protein per 100 grams of vegetables
Soybeans – 36 grams of protein per 100 grams of vegetables

* An important note to make here is that soybeans are one of the few vegetables that’s a complete protein.

1st Phorm Can Help You Get The Protein You Need

If you don’t want to eat an endless amount of chicken to reach your protein goals, there is another option. 1st Phorm offers four different protein shake mixes to help you meet your specific protein goals. We even off a vegan protein mix that we call the Vegan Power Pro which has a complete amino acid protein profile.

Come check out our protein supplements and find the one that best fits your fitness needs!

 

*This post was written by Will Grumke. He is a NASM Certified Personal Trainer, NASM Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist, NASM Certified Weight Loss Specialist, NASM Certified Behavioral Change Specialist, and CrossFit Level 1 Trainer

Muscle Building Supplements | 1st Phorm

Please wait...